Category Archives: Interest

News and information from around that world that might be of interest to people using bikes as transporation

Happy holidays!

It’s hard to believe that the end of the year is almost here! For Bikebridge, 2016 has been eventful! We’ve held a movie night, provided bike valet for Dragonboat and Tour of Alberta, participated in developing the Cycling Master Plan, helped with Jane’s Ride, and biked in the Whoop Up Days parade, just to name a few.

As we wind down for the year and head into the holidays, the BikeBridge wishes each of you a merry Christmas and a happy new year.

2017 is starting to shape up to be eventful, too. Keep an eye on our website and our Facebook group to stay up to date on upcoming events.

Bikebridge and City Officials attend ABBCC!

On September 26-27, 2015, several members of Bikebridge had the great pleasure to attend the 3rd annual Alberta Bicycle Commuters’ Conference (ABBCC) in Canmore.

The two-day conference, dedicated to promoting bicycling as a means of transportation, explored a wide range of topics.  Among these were promoting safe bicycling, celebrating successful implementations of bicycle infrastructure (Calgary), reviewing bicycling initiatives already underway in Ontario and Quebec, and exploring possibilities for setting up an umbrella organization to promote bicycling as transportation in Alberta. It was all enormously interesting and very inspiring!

We were also very pleased that one Lethbridge council member, Jeff Coffman, and two officials from the City of Lethbridge Transportation Department attended.  They were able to hear first hand about what was happening to promote cycling in other jurisdictions, and participate in the general discussion sessions.

To explore further, click on the links for the slides from the ABBCC presentations:  ABBCC presentations.

Also, we were introduced to a number of other web sites where a wealth of information on bicycling can be found. Check it out for yourself!

Share the Road Cycling Coalition
http://www.sharetheroad.ca

Ontario Cycling Advocacy Network (OntarioCAN)
http://www.sharetheroad.ca/ontariocan-s16795

The League of American Bicyclists
http://bikeleague.org

Alberta TrailNet
http://www.albertatrailnet.com

Alberta Bicycle Network
http://www.albertabicycle.ab.ca

ALBERTA TRAFFIC SAFETY FUND (ATSF) – grants are available to Alberta communities for traffic safety initiatives.
http://www.saferoads.com/ATSF/traffic-safety-fund.htm

Bridges and Pedways: Cities slowly adapt to pedestrians and cyclists. . .

Here are several pictures of a newly constructed pedway in Toronto – an example of how cities are slowly becoming more pedestrian and bike friendly.  This pedway is expected to spur retail and office developments around the Pickering Station.

It was designed to serve both pedestrians and bicyclists, crosses 14 lanes of traffic, is completely glass enclosed, and has elevators in addition to stairs at each of its access points. The $22.5-million project opened in January, 2012 and was constructed mainly at night to minimize traffic disruption.

In October 2012, the Lethbridge City Council was given projected figures of around $60 million to build what seems like a much simpler pedway (no glass enclosure, no elevators) across the Oldman River. Maybe this gives us a bit of hope that it wouldn’t be hard so expensive (?!) to bridge the Oldman after all!

You can comment on this post for up to thirty days after its post date. After that, you can always give us your comments through the Contact page. We look forward to hearing from you!

 

Benchmarking Report (2012)

(US) Alliance for Biking and Walking Releases 2012 Benchmarking Report

The Alliance for Biking and Walking has released its comprehensive report on cycling and walking infastructure, funding, and safety for 2012. The report shows that increasing bicycling and walking are goals that are clearly in the public interest.

Where bicycling and walking levels are higher, obesity, high blood pressure, and diabetes levels are lower. Higher levels of bicycling and walking also coincide with increased bicycle and pedestrian safety and higher levels of physical activity. Increasing bicycling and walking can help solve many serious problems.

As this report indicates, many states and cities are making progress toward promoting safe access for bicyclists and pedestrians, but much more remains to be done.

Highlights

Bicycling and Walking Levels

  • 12% of all trips are by bicycle (1.0%) or foot (10.5%).
  • From 2000 to 2009, the number of commuters who bicycle to work increased by 57%.
  • In 2009, 40% of trips in the United States were shorter than 2 miles, yet Americans use their cars for 87% of trips 1 to 2 miles. Twenty-seven percent of trips are shorter than 1 mile, yet 62% of trips up to 1 mile long are by car. Residents of the largest U.S. cities are 1.7 times more likely to walk or bicycle to work than the national average

Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety

  • 14% of all traffic fatalities in the U.S. are bicyclists (1.8%) or pedestrians (11.7%).
  • In the 51 largest U.S. cities, 12.7% of trips are by foot and 1.1% are by bicycle, yet 26.9% of traffic fatalities are pedestrians and 3.1% are bicyclists.
Seniors are the most vulnerable bicyclists and pedestrians. Adults over 65 make up 10% of walking trips, yet comprise 19% of pedestrian fatalities and make up 6% of bicycling trips, yet account for and 10% of bicyclist fatalities.

Public Health Benefits

  • 
Bicycling and walking levels fell 66% between 1960 and 2009, while obesity levels increased by 156%.
  • Between 1966 and 2009, the number of children who bicycled or walked to school fell 75%, while the percentage of obese children rose 276%.
  • 
In general, states with the highest levels of bicycling and walking have the lowest levels of obesity, hypertension (high blood pressure), and diabetes and have the greatest percentage of adults who meet the recommended 30-plus minutes per day of physical activity.

Economic Benefits


Bicycling and walking projects create 11-14 jobs per $1 million spent, compared to just 7 jobs created per $1 million spent on highway projects.
Cost benefit analyses show that up to $11.80 in benefits can be gained for every $1 invested in bicycling and walking.

2012 Benchmarking Report

 

 

 

 

PRATS | Downtown Lethbridge – Bicycle Users’ Considerations

The City Community Planning Department is undertaking PRATS**, a Public Realm and Transportation Study for Downtown Lethbridge to assist in the fulfillment of the Heart of Our City Master Plan vision.

As part of the study, BikeBridge is being included as a stakeholder to provide the perspective of the bicycle transportation user in Downtown Lethbridge.

Charrettes Design Sessions From June 13 through the 16, the City is holding a charrette design session where stakeholders will come together to explorer ideas for the study area and downtown.  BikeBridge will have a representative in attendance.

June 7, BikeBridge submitted a “PRATS Downtown Bicycle User Considerations” paper as a guide for consideration of bicycle transportation use downtown generally and the for charrette design process.  The Paper can be viewed as a PDF on Google Docs.

Please refer back to this website posting periodically for updates and information on the PRATS process: developments as well as noted concerns.

The BikeBridge Board encourages your ideas and comments, please feel free to add those as comments to this post.

*  *  *

** PRATS will outline short to medium term (10-20 years) strategies encompassing improvements to the public realm components including: the transportation network, streetscapes, open spaces, gateways & public art, pedestrian and cycling connections, public transit, and public parking.  Recommendation will be expected to effectively address both current and future developments in downtown Lethbirdge.

Currently the Study Areas:

The current study area is along 5th ST S from 5th AVE to 1 AVE, and includes 2 AVE S from Scenic Drive to 5 ST, 3 AVE S from 4 ST to 5 ST and a section of 3 AVE from 7 ST to 8 ST

2011-13 City Bike Lanes & Pathways Projects Plan

11-01 Regional Pathway along West side of Scenic Drive S from 4th Ave to 1st Ave S

This is not contained in the Master Plan
There are no details on how this trail will cross Whoop Up or the other Avenues
Master Plan project 71, 72, 67 (pages 61) 67 and 71 are described as promenades, 72 is an on street bike lane

11-02 Bike lanes or Bike route along 10 AVE S from MMDR to 13 ST and along 13 ST S from 10 AVE to 16 AVE S

Master Plan 28 (page 52)
 

spacse

space

11-03 Regional Pathway along MMDR S from 10 AVE S to 12 AVE S

Master Plan 56 (page 53)
 

11-04 Local Connector along Coulee Top from Canyon Crest to University

No Master Plan reference
 
 
 
 

12-01 Local Connector along 26 AVE N West of 36 ST N

No Master Plan reference

12-02 Bike lanes or Bike route along 9 AVE N from 28 ST N to Scenic Drive N

Master Plan project 49 (page 58)

12-03 Bike lanes or Bike route along 3 AVE S from MMDR to 13 ST S

Master Plan project 60 (page 53)

12-04 Local Connector along Columbia from to Laval Blvd

No Master Plan reference

13-01 Bike lanes or Bike route along 2 AVE N and 28 ST N from 43 ST N to 5 AVE N

No Master Plan reference

13-02 Regional Pathway along Crowsnest Trail from MMDR S  to 43 ST S

Master Plan project 14 (page 51)

13-03 Regional Pathway along Whoop DR W and University DR W

Master Plan project 6 (page 55)

13-04 Bike lane or Bike route along McMaster BLVD W and MacLeod DR W from Columbia DR W to University DR W

Master Plan project 4 (page54)  – note plan calls for high speed commuter pathway.

 

Please add your comments and suggestions below.

 
 
 

Cyclists Pedal Faster On Wednesdays

According to a Dec. 1st Technology Review article, “The first analysis of data from shared bicycle networks in Europe, reveals some surprising urban cycling patterns In 2005, the French city of Lyon introduced a shared bicycle system called Velo’v that has since inspired numerous other schemes around the world. Velo’v differed from earlier schemes in its innovative technology, such as electronic locks, onboard computers and access via smart cards. The system now offers some 4000 bikes at almost 350 stations around the city. Most residents agree that the system has transformed the city from a grid-locked nightmare to a cyclists dream, with some 16,000 journeys now being completed each day.”

“All this presents researchers with an interesting opportunity. Since its introduction, the system has kept track of the start and finishing location plus travel time of every journey. Today, we get a detailed analysis of this data from Pablo Jensen at the École Normale Supérieure de Lyon and a few amis. They looked at 11.6 million bicycle trips in Lyon between May 2005 and December 2007. The result is the first robust characterisation of urban bikers’ behaviour, they say…Over an average trip, cyclists travel 2.49 km in 14.7 minutes so their average speed is about 10 km/h. That compares well with the average car speed in inner cities across Europe…”

Source: Technology Review