Category Archives: Education

Fourth Annual Lethbridge Bike Swap on April 30, 2016 in the Southminster United Church gymnasium!

Sellers, let Alberta Bike Swap do the work for you in exchange for a portion of the proceeds!  Just drop of your bike in the morning, pay a small rack fee, and receive a cheque in the mail shortly thereafter.  More info at: http://albertabikeswap.ca/location/lethbridge

Buyers, take advantage of a wide selection of bicycles at attractive prices. New bikes (from the Lethbridge shops), healthy used bikes (all checked on site for road-worthiness), and probably some fixer-uppers for the extreme bargain hunter or spare parts enthusiast.

Volunteers are needed to help with set up, intake, sales, tear down, and various work throughout the day. Alberta Bike Swap is two people (two!) who are most generous with their time and the proceeds from the swaps in order to promote safe and happy cycling for Albertans. They need our assistance to keep the swap running. Don’t be intimidated by the volunteer application:  http://albertabikeswap.ca/volunteer-form The skill offerings include “Other, and I don’t mind being assigned”. Also, pay no heed to any mention of an oversupply of volunteers. That happens in Calgary, not Lethbridge.

Hope to see you there!

Bikebridge and City Officials attend ABBCC!

On September 26-27, 2015, several members of Bikebridge had the great pleasure to attend the 3rd annual Alberta Bicycle Commuters’ Conference (ABBCC) in Canmore.

The two-day conference, dedicated to promoting bicycling as a means of transportation, explored a wide range of topics.  Among these were promoting safe bicycling, celebrating successful implementations of bicycle infrastructure (Calgary), reviewing bicycling initiatives already underway in Ontario and Quebec, and exploring possibilities for setting up an umbrella organization to promote bicycling as transportation in Alberta. It was all enormously interesting and very inspiring!

We were also very pleased that one Lethbridge council member, Jeff Coffman, and two officials from the City of Lethbridge Transportation Department attended.  They were able to hear first hand about what was happening to promote cycling in other jurisdictions, and participate in the general discussion sessions.

To explore further, click on the links for the slides from the ABBCC presentations:  ABBCC presentations.

Also, we were introduced to a number of other web sites where a wealth of information on bicycling can be found. Check it out for yourself!

Share the Road Cycling Coalition
http://www.sharetheroad.ca

Ontario Cycling Advocacy Network (OntarioCAN)
http://www.sharetheroad.ca/ontariocan-s16795

The League of American Bicyclists
http://bikeleague.org

Alberta TrailNet
http://www.albertatrailnet.com

Alberta Bicycle Network
http://www.albertabicycle.ab.ca

ALBERTA TRAFFIC SAFETY FUND (ATSF) – grants are available to Alberta communities for traffic safety initiatives.
http://www.saferoads.com/ATSF/traffic-safety-fund.htm

Alberta Bicycle Commuters Conference – be there!

The third Alberta Bicycle Commuters Conference will happen September 26-27 in Canmore.  This will be a bigger and more ambitious event than the last two, aiming to build momentum toward creating a provincial cycling strategy, as some other provinces have done.

The keynote speaker will be Eleanor McMahon, founder of Share The Road Ontario, which prompted the provincial government to formulate their CycleON plan.  Other presentations are expected to be offered by a key individual from Velo Quebec and City of Calgary staff who have been involved in promoting cycling and creating the infrastructure there.  Taking it in and participating in discussion should be elected officials, municipal planning and transportation staff from across the province, advocates for cycling and active transportation, and you, the everyday bike rider.  More details will be posted as they are confirmed.

Extra-conference activities in Canmore that weekend include the  BikeBike Harvest Full Moon Ride on Saturday night and the Bike Shorts Film Festival on Sunday evening.

Canmore is a popular destination in September, so book early and look forward to an inspiring weekend with great people collaborating on an important aspect of our life in Alberta.

Racks: What to look for, and new ones in Lethbridge!

Did You Know?

  • Good bicycle security begins with good bicycle racks!
  • Secure bicycle parking is quickly becoming a competitive amenity for many property owners, and businesses.
  • Many cyclists will patronize a business that offers bicycle parking over one that does not.

Suggestions for Installing or Upgrading Bicycle Parking Facilities

A secure and useable bicycle parking rack will be… Continue reading

FLVT Bikefest on June 6, 2014 − what a day!

Several hundred bicycles all being used in one place in Lethbridge! (The picture at the top on this web site is from that day, just before things got rolling!)

FLVT stands for Father Leonard Van Tighem School (primary and junior high) in West Lethbridge.  Conceived and organized by teacher Steve Leger, the first BikeFest, held on June 6, included a skills area, an obstacle race course, newspaper tossing for carriers, a safety course, bike and helmet checks, and maintenance demonstrations.

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Cycling Backbone Route Networks for Lethbridge

BikeBridge has been working on an idea we are calling a Cycling Backbone Route (CBR) network.  It is our hope that such a network would provide a planning basis for where (and how) the City focuses on cycling infrastructure developments.  The CBR network would allow cyclists to ride year-round from and to any part of the city within a bike-prioritized, uninterrupted framework.  Essentially, cyclists could use existing roads and trails to reach a backbone route and then the connected network to reach other sections of our city.

A CBR is infrastructure and other supporting structures and systems that give priority to city-wide travel by bicycle.

Backbone routes broadly connect all sections of the city to each other: West-East (including the river valley), North-South (including Crows Nest Trail/Rail corridor), Lethbridge College to Downtown, access to South East warehouse retailing, access to and throughout Industrial Parks, access to downtown, access to University, access to West Lethbridge retail centre.  The Backbone functions like a transit route in that the cyclist accesses the nearest route by utilizing existing and unspecified roadways, pathway, etc.

The CBR network allows cyclists to traverse the city quickly, directly, safely, using moderate to low energy, year round.

A CBR primarily utilizes existing roadways, augmented by dedicated bikeways where needed to maintain connectivity (satisfy standards).  In order of priority, the CBR is applied using the following infrastructure and supporting systems:

1. Secondary and residential streets as Bicycle Boulevards
2. Arterial roadways as designated bike lanes
3. Dedicated Bikeways

1. Bicycle Boulevards

A bicycle boulevard is a low speed street which has been optimized for bicycle traffic. Bicycle boulevards discourage cut-through motor vehicle traffic but allow local motor vehicle traffic. They are designed to give priority to cyclists as through-going traffic. They are intended to improve cyclist comfort and/or safety through various means:

  • discouragement of non-local motor vehicle traffic;
  •  low speed limits;
  •  low motor vehicle traffic volumes;
  •  free-flow travel for bikes by assigning the right-of-way to the bicycle boulevard at intersections wherever possible;
  • traffic control to help bicycles cross major arterial roads; and
  • a distinctive look and/or ambiance such that cyclists become aware of the existence of the bike boulevard and motorists are alerted that the street is a priority route for bicyclists.

Bicycle boulevards use a variety of traffic calming elements to achieve a safe environment. For instance, diverters with bicycle cut-outs at mid-block allow motorists to enter the block in order to park or otherwise access a property, and allow cyclists to continue to the next block as well, but do not allow motorists to continue.

Bicycle boulevards often have higher road surface standards than other residential streets, and encourage riders to use the full lane, encouraging parity between bicycles and motor vehicles.

Bicycle boulevards have a snow removal (winter maintenance) and cleaning priority.

2. Designated Bike Lane

Bike lanes should only be required where routes cannot be provided using bicycle boulevards (given overall standards of safety and directness). Dedicated bike lanes are specifically markers areas on existing arterial and collector roadways for use only by cyclists (except where it is necessary for access purposes by other transportation users). Bike lanes include on street standardized lane marked areas that are maintained for all season use and include considerable signage, left turn cycling boxes and traffic signal activation.

Bike lanes have a snow removal (winter maintenance) and cleaning priority.

3. Dedicated Bikeways

Dedicated bikeways should only be required where a route cannot be provided using a bike boulevards of bike lanes (given overall standards of safety, directness and fitness).

A dedicated bikeway is essentially a two way physically separated (by distance or structures) bicycle freeway maximizing speed and minimizing intersection with other transportation users and minimizing physical requirements (grades). Bikeways are not “multi-use” facilities and may therefore required provision of separated facilities for pedestrians.

Bikeways could utilize exiting roadways using physical separation of cars from bikes using: planters, motor vehicle parking, and medians.
Bikeways have a snow removal (winter maintenance) and cleaning priority.

Motorists, cyclists – education and respect needed

by: Constance Sheriff  date:  November 28, 2010

Letter to the Editor, Lethbridge Herald

As an avid cyclist who regularly commutes to work, I have had some unpleasant interactions with motorists recently. Lethbridge is not an especially safe city for cyclists, but motorists and cyclists are often both to blame. For example, some motorists do not accept that I am entitled to cycle on the road,

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